Thursday, October 26, 2006

Letter to Readers

I hope you enjoyed Tabitha and Sebastian’s story. I certainly had fun writing about those wild characters. Incidentally, this was my first time using cops as the hero and the heroine. Doing research for this unique occupation gave me and I hope you valuable insight into the lives of those who pledge to serve and protect us.

To all the good cops out there, I want to personally say thank you for putting your lives on the line everyday for people whom you may never personally know, but whose quality of life depends on you doing a quality job. To the bad cops, well…let’s just say that a lot of people would be thankful if you changed jobs…soon.

Now on to other things…

Nestled within Hump Day are several references to the Seeds of Peace program that was founded by John Wallach in 1993 after the first attack on the World Trade Center. This program was designed to bring together young future leaders from regions of conflict and to equip them with the leadership skills required to advance reconciliation and coexistence.

I wanted to highlight the Seeds of Peace program because I believe in it and I believe that programs like it are extremely necessary in today’s world. This is also why I had Tabitha to establish a type of spin-off program in order to change her own community. For more information about the Seeds of Peace program visit: www.seedsofpeace.org.

Finally, I touched briefly on the subject of Schizophrenia due to an experience I had with someone who was unfortunately afflicted with this disease. I saw this otherwise very sweet woman change into someone else right before my very eyes. It saddened me deeply to see her confused, extremely angry for no logical reason, and out of touch with reality.

If this book ever reaches that woman, know that I don’t hold your disease or the things you did while under the weight of this disease against you. I’m also praying for your complete recovery, dear one. After all, God is a God of miracles and nothing is too hard for Him.

After that experience, dear readers, I decided to not only be compassionate towards those suffering from this severe mental disease, but to also be informed. And because I want you to be informed as well, I’ve included a few facts about the disease below:

  • Schizophrenia is characterized by unpredictable disturbances in thinking. The very word means a splitting of the mind. It refers to the characteristic schizophrenic behavior of withdrawing from reality and thinking in illogical, confused patterns. The term does not mean that a patient has more than one personality.
  • Schizophrenia is one of the most common mental disorders and afflicts about one percent of the world’s population. Most patients develop the disease from their late teens to mid-twenties. Men tend to develop it earlier than women and often more severely.
  • Many people with schizophrenia develop delusions and behave as though they live in a fantasy world. They may hear ‘voices’ that others cannot hear and may believe that these ‘voices’ carry messages from important people, or even from God.
  • Schizophrenics often suffer disturbances in mood and behavior. Some patients seem to feel no emotions, but others may display inappropriate emotions, such as laughing at sad situations. Some patients withdraw from their family and friends and talk mainly to themselves or to their ‘voices’.
  • Physicians do not know the cause of schizophrenia. Viral infections, drug abuse, or trauma during birth may increase a person’s risk of developing the disease. Genetic factors may be partly responsible for some cases. Abnormal brain chemistry also plays a role.
  • There are currently drugs available that can control the symptoms of schizophrenia with fewer side effects. Many have found psychotherapy and rehabilitation programs helpful in allowing patients to live outside the hospital. Unfortunately, a small number of patients do not respond to treatment and must remain hospitalized.


Article citation: Thompson, Paul M. “Schizophrenia.” World Book Online Reference Center. 2005. World Book, Inc. 26 Jan. 2005. http://www.aolsvc.worldbook.aol.com/wb/Article?id=ar494660

I hope this information helped someone. Be blessed.


© 2006 by Suprina Frazier


(Don’t forget to stay tuned for Diesel’s story in Diesel’s Fuel)

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